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1. For each year through 2025, California employers will need an average of 160,000 more college graduates than the state will produce or can be expected through in-migration.
Can California Import Enough College Graduates to Meet Workforce Needs? 
Issued by The Public Policy Institute of California, May 2007 and funded by The Hewlett Foundation. Authors: Hans Johnson and Deborah Reed

2. Over this same period, there will be an average annual surplus of 21,000 high school graduates entering the California workforce.
Can California Import Enough College Graduates to Meet Workforce Needs? 
Issued by The Public Policy Institute of California, May 2007 and funded by The Hewlett Foundation. Authors: Hans Johnson and Deborah Reed

3. Fifteen year-olds in the US placed 24th out of forty nations in their ability to apply mathematical concepts to real world problems.
Rising Above The Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future
Published by The National Academy of Sciences, The National Academy of Engineering, and the National Institutes of Medicine, copyright 2007.
Commissioned by the Senate Energy Subcommittee of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and by the House Committee on Science.

4. A recent study commissioned by Congress reported that only 6.5% of US high school students annually take one or more advanced placement exam versus the 23% that is needed to be globally competitive. This study also recommended a goal of reaching the 23% level by 2010.
Rising Above The Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future
Published by The National Academy of Sciences, The National Academy of Engineering, and the National Institutes of Medicine, copyright 2007.
Commissioned by the Senate Energy Subcommittee of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and by the House Committee on Science.

5. “Our current expectations for what our students should learn in school were set fifty years ago to meet the needs of an economy based on manufacturing and agriculture. We now have an economy based on knowledge and technology. Despite the best efforts of many committed educators and administrators, our high schools have simply failed to adapt to this change.”
Bill Gates testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions,  March 7, 2007 
http://www.gatesfoundation.org/MediaCenter/Speeches/Co-ChairSpeeches/BillgSpeeches/BGSpeechesHELP-070307.htm

6. “America has one of the lowest high school graduation rates in the industrialized world. According to a study released by Education Week, three out of every 10 ninth-grade students will not graduate on time and about half of all African American and Hispanic ninth graders will not earn a diploma in four years. Of those who do graduate and continue on to college, over a quarter have to take remedial courses on material they should have learned in high school. Employers complain that high school graduates today lack the basic writing and analytic skills required to succeed even in entry level positions”.
Bill Gates testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, March 7, 2007 
http://www.gatesfoundation.org/MediaCenter/Speeches/Co-ChairSpeeches/BillgSpeeches/BGSpeechesHELP-070307.htm


 
Additional Reference Material

It is clear that the next generation entering the workforce will face significant career challenges. Large gaps exist between the skills needed by employers and the development of students by our public education systems. The attached list of reference material provides startling detail on those gaps and their scope.

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Succeeding in a Flat World

Thomas Friedman’s book, The World Is Flat, identifies a number of trends that will dominate the range of careers
available to our children.  Trends which already manifest themselves today are irreversible and predict a vastly different American jobscape than seen by employees and employers today. 

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